May 17 - 19 2024

Shelsley Walsh Hill Climb, Worcester, WR6 6RP

Party on the Hill.

In 2024 the Triumph Owners’ Motor Cycle Club will be 75 years old and on 17th-19th May 2024 we will be celebrating the event with a party at the historic Shelsley Walsh Hill Climb venue set in the Malvern Hills of Worcestershire.

There will be a bar, food, and music/entertainment. There will be demonstrations taking place on the hill of special Triumph machines from throughout the ages, TOMCC branches and sections will be displaying their own machines in the historic paddock, and there will be trade stands also.

Tickets for TOMCC 75 are available online at https://www.ticketebo.co.uk/tomcc75.

Ticket price includes free camping on site.

Admission will be by tickets bought online only and a commemorative programme and a specially struck commemorative badge of the event is included within the ticket price of £35.00 per person (under 16’s are free - tickets for them are optional but would help us with numbers).

If you like looking at, talking about, and celebrating Triumph motorcycles, then this event is for you.

NOTE: The commemorative programme and badge will only be available at the event.

 

Location:

 

Entertainment:

There will be bike displays and demonstrations, music and entertainment, bars, food and free camping and on the Saturday, the Shelsley Walsh hill will play host to the sights and sounds of special Triumph machines from throughout the years for everyone to see and hear.

Friday: Arrive, free camping for all, meet and greet with food, bar and music.

Friday Evening: There will be a disco from 7pm.

Saturday: The party starts with TOMCC branch displays, the chance to see and hear rare and special Triumph machines taking to the hill with food/music/entertainment/bar throughout the day, including Piston Gin.

Saturday Evening: The disco will start at 6:30pm and the Domino Sugar band will then do two one-hour sets from 8pm to 9pm and 9:30pm to 10:30pm.

Sunday: Breakfast time, say goodbyes and depart for home.

 

Facilities:

A celebration for such a milestone in TOMCC history needed a special location to hold it and Shelsley Walsh is that place. Set in some of England's most beautiful and rural countryside in the Malvern Hills of Worcestershire, Shelsley Walsh was first used on 12th August 1905. It was the first purpose built motor sport venue in history and is the oldest motor sport venue in the world still to run events on the original course. Older than Le Mans, Indianapolis or Monza it also has a rather special Triumph connection too, as Shelsley Walsh is where the Triumph factory tested a number of their prototype machines during the 1940s and 50s, setting hill climb records in the process before putting the machines into production.

Shortly after the Second World War, well known Irish road racer Ernie Lyons persuaded Edward Turner to provide him with an engine for road racing. A not inconsiderable feat given Turner's particular and well-known views on road racing. But persuade he did and following Edward Turner’s instructions, including to use as many production parts as possible, Triumph’s Chief Development Engineer Freddie Clarke built a twin-cylinder 500cc road race engine in the Meriden development shop. The result was an engine which utilised a Tiger 100 bottom end fitted with the light alloy head and barrel from the Triumph wartime generator unit used to power equipment inside the RAF’s legendary, Lancaster bomber. This was then mounted in a rigid Tiger 100 frame with rear mounted footrests, a sprung hub, an experimental eight-inch single-sided front brake, narrow mudguards and racing number plates. After racing the new machine to victory in the 1946 Manx Grand Prix, Lyons also used it to set the fastest time up the Shelsley Walsh hill. Exactly the same hill used to this day.

And at least one of those GP500cc machines will be taking to the hill for you to see and hear!

Shelsley Walsh 1946, and Ernie Lyons rounds the notorious S-bend at speed on his 500c.c. Triumph to make fastest time of the day for two wheels or four. A month earlier, on the same machine, he had won the first post-war race held on the Isle of Man - the 1946 Manx Grand Prix. Performances that launched him into a career as a top line road racer. The prototype machine developed into the Triumph G.P. model which won the Manx Grand Prix again in 1948, and came fifth and sixth in the 1949 Senior T.T. in the hands of private owners.

 

Further Information:

There will be a limited number of machines that will be able to run up the Hill. If you have a special or rare machine then you will get precedence. Runs will not be timed and are not competitive - make your way up at the speed you are happy with, after all you are showing off your bike. You must be wearing usual bike protective gear including gloves and of course a helmet.

Tickets for TOMCC 75 are available online at https://www.ticketebo.co.uk/tomcc75.

 

Gallery: